Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.ctu.edu.vn/jspui/handle/123456789/5198
Title: Paper-based colorimetric biosensor for antibiotics inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis
Authors: Trần, Thị Mỹ Duyên
Hirata, Kazumasa
Harada, Kazuo
Muraoka, Misa
Ujiie, Kazuki
Matsuura, Hideyuki
Keywords: Resistant bacteria
Environmental water
Cell-free protein synthesis
Paper-based biosensor
Paromomycin
Tetracycline
Chloramphenicol
Erythromycin
β-Galactosidase
Chlorophenol red-β-D-galactopyranoside]
Issue Date: 2017
Series/Report no.: Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering;123 .- p.96-100
Abstract: Due to the presence of antibiotics in environmental water and their potential influence on the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, development of a detection method suitable for the screening of environmental water for antibiotics is required. In this study, we developed a simple colorimetric paper-based biosensor based on a novel principle for the detection of antibiotics inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, including aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and macrolides. This biosensor is based on the detection of a color change induced by β-galactosidase, which is synthesized on freeze-dried paper discs containing an in vitro transcription/translation system. When a water sample without antibiotics is applied to the paper discs, β-galactosidase can be synthesized, and it hydrolyzes a colorimetric substrate, resulting in a color change from yellow to purple. By contrast, in the presence of antibiotics, the color change can be hampered due to an inhibition of β-galactosidase synthesis. We investigated the effect of the incubation temperature and pH of water samples and confirmed that the paper discs showed the color change to purple in the ranges of 15–37°C and pH 6–10. We observed concentration-dependent color variations of the paper discs by the naked eye and further estimated detection limits to be 0.5, 2.1, 0.8, and 6.1 μg/mL for paromomycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin, respectively, using digitized pictures. The paper-based biosensor proved to detect 0.5 μg/mL paromomycin, spiked in real environmental water samples, by the naked eye.
URI: http://localhost:8080//jspui/handle/123456789/5198
Appears in Collections:Tạp chí quốc tế

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